Webstock 2016

In January this year I applied for a scholarship to attend Webstock 2016 in mid February. I had seen information about the scholarship a few weeks before I applied but I wasn’t too sure if Webstock would be good/useful to go to being a very new developer. I didn’t actually really know what Webstock was all about.

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Then I came across this post by Natasha Lampard. Makes for fascinating reading. And so I applied and gained a scholarship to attend Webstock.

Having attend a few different conferences while teaching (Ulearn comes to mind), and having attended WDCNZ in 2015, I had an idea of what a large scale conference would be like.

However, Webstock is run differently. There is one stage, one stream of presentations, no smaller venues for different speakers or multiple themes. One stage, one presenter about every half hour. So actaully quite different to other events.

And what a mixture of speakers. From Luke Wroblewski talking about Screen Time (the kind of thing I was expecting) to Annie Machon who is a former MI5 intelligence officer-turned-whistleblower and Cindy Gallop telling us Why The Next Big Thing In Tech Is Disrupting Sex.

I think there was something for everyone in the eclectic mixture of speakers.

I think all the talks will be up sometime soon at http://www.webstock.org.nz/talks/, there is already six years of Webstock talks up to view (if I could only take a month off and watch them all!).

Screen Time

Luke Wroblewski – www.lukew.com

Screen time used to mean sitting in front of a TV. Today we move between screens of various sizes, proportions, and quality all day. The abundance and diversity of devices can overwhelm teams delivering software. We need practical ways to tackle the problems that come with this diversity of screens. Luke explores a deeper understanding of screen time today and ways to design effective cross-screen experiences for tomorrow.

Here is a link to his talk, not the one he did at Webstock but the same talk (with slides, handy!). He talked about history of glass and four things to consider 1. know your screen, 2. output, 3. input, 4. posture. One thing I didn’t know is that you can get a lot of data about users and what devices they have via your website and apps and from that you can then tail content for them.

The Map and The Territory

Ethan Marcotte – ethanmarcotte.com

When we create for the web, we participate in a kind of public art. We code, we design, we build for an audience, making digital experiences that provide a service, that create joy, or that simply connect readers with words written half a world away. But in this session we’ll revisit what we’ve learned about responsive design, and ensure our content, not just our design, is readily accessible to them wherever they are. In doing so, we’ll look at some ways in which our audience reshapes the way we think about our medium, and see where they might be leading us—and the web—next.

 

This talk started off with looking to the past and the mapping of Manhattan. Ethan coined the term “responsive web design”. He talked about the digital divide and how in parts of the world most devices a sub 3G and that this will change the way people design sites. The idea of “good design” will change. It also look at the performance budget, reducing and revisiting, pages should not weight more then 300kbs, and to consider loading speed? 

This shows how much I have yet to learn. As I don’t even know how to figure out how quickly a page loads, how fast it is, what things effect it (besides image sizes!).

CSS Wizardry

Harry Roberts – csswizardry.com

For his Webstock presentation, dressed as a wizardHarry will perform an interpretive mime cycle, translating the array of human emotions in architecting, writing and scaling CSS for large sites, apps, and products in large-team environments.

His silent exercises, which include such classic works as the cage, walking against the wind, the mask maker, and satires on everything from sculptors to matadors, have been described as works of genius.

I was looking forward to this talk about CSS, however, due to it being a non-technical audience, Harry changed the focus. He talked about doing lots of travelling and talking at conferences. Some interesting travel tips like using a different card to keep the power on in your hotel room when you go out.

Did a Google search to find a presentation of his, What Is A CSS Framework Anyway?, from Industry Conf, and slides https://speakerdeck.com/csswizardry/what-is-a-css-framework-anyway. Haven’t watched it yet.

Adaptive Content, Context, and Controversy

Karen McGrane – karenmcgrane.com

In 2016, “adaptive content” has become a buzzword. To some, it’s a complex, long-term initiative to structure content for flexible reuse and dynamic targeting. To others, it’s a way to ensure that everyone, everywhere, sees exactly what they want—like magic! In this talk, Karen shares her perspective (and reservations) on how adaptive content is being used today. She’ll discuss how adaptive content supports targeting content to device type—and why that’s rarely necessary. She’ll also describe ways that adaptive content can support tailoring content according to context—and ways that can go wrong. You’ll walk away with a better understanding of when adaptive content is necessary and how to get the most value from it.

This was good. Difficult for me to describe as by this point if the day I decided just to soak everything up and didn’t take many notes. I will definitely be watching this when the videos come out. In the mean time, here is one from her site https://karenmcgrane.com/2012/09/04/adapting-ourselves-to-adaptive-content-video-slides-and-transcript-oh-my/.

Bug Fixes & Minor Improvements, Writ Large (aka Humorous Self-Flagellation and the Multiple Benefits of Being Old On The Internet)

Anna Pickard – annapickard.com

Somehow, improbably, the release note — that little space used by apps to describe their latest updates – has become a remarkable, human way for the creators of software to communicate with their users, and Slack (where Anna words*) has been at the forefront of the movement to turn that microcopical nugget of technical documentation very few people bother reading into (basically) a new literary genre. This little revolution didn’t happen by accident though: it’s the result of a fortunate series of events, a short list of values about how to behave as a company, and a long trail of people feeling out what it means to be oneself on the interweb.

This was a great talk and I now read all the release notes for Slack. If you are involved in writing well worth a watch.

Why The Next Big Thing In Tech Is Disrupting Sex

Cindy Gallop – @cindygallop

The tech world welcomes, supports and funds innovation and disruption in every area of our lives and work – except one. Join Cindy Gallop, founder & CEO of http://makelovenotporn.com/, for a provocative, insightful and revelatory examination of what constitutes sextech, how it can bring about world peace, the battles she and other sextech entrepreneurs fight every day to build their ventures, the huge amount of money there is to be made, and why New Zealand has a unique opportunity to become a global hub for sextech.

Now this was a talk that I wasn’t expecting at a tech conference (although, I learnt that Webstock isn’t really a tech conference). This was a fascinating presentation. Here is her talk at TED a few years ago – http://blog.ted.com/cindy_gallop_ma/


That’s my brief (and rather late) blog post about Webstock ’16.

As I was writing it I started thinking about professional development in the developer world. My next post will be about this.

Github, html, css – starting out!

Early this year I was introduced to Github at the RailsGirlsWgtn Weekend back in March. Over the weekend there was the chance to create your own Ruby on Rails app, using Github and other sites to get it working. I must admit it was all a bit of a mystery to me and I doubt I could go back and recreate any of it, including the command lines to get stuff onto Github.

Since then I have learnt quite a bit more about programming (see posts about Python) and have developed my knowledge of HTML / CSS. For our Y12 Digital Technology class this year we have done quite a bit of website stuff and I have learnt more about using divs for layouts and cool sytling in CSS and my skills and confidence have improved.

Not long ago I came across Alyx Gillett’s website, which I think has a really cool and simple layout and design. So I started to look into creating one for myself. I looked at what hers is made in, which is www.squarespace.com. Looks cool but you have to pay after a free 14 day trial and it gives a bunch of stuff but nothing I think I need at the moment. And the  i had a brainwave, as I am a DT teacher wouldn’t it be cool if I made my own site completely from scratch. So I started have a play around with some ideas, look at some sites that had layouts I liked. This one provides the HTML & CSS – www.maxdesign.com.au. I started playing around with the Two column fixed width example and the One column fixed width layout.

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After playing for a bit I got busy with other things until just the last few days. I decided I wanted to have a crack again and also thought it was about time I started a wee project of my own. I thought creating my own site and getting it up online would be a good place to start plus it is a chance for me to really embed my own learning and think about how I can improve my own teaching of HTML & CSS.

So, after doing some Google searches about using Github and discovering Github for Windows and Mac, and learning about being able to use gh-pages to host a static website I pushed my wee site out into cyberspace. Using Github for Windows/Mac is so much easier then using the command lines – although I am sure it will be useful to know those sometime in the future.

Here is my site – http://schuknight.github.io/schuknight-site/. Still very much a work in progress and a learning tool for me.

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Here I am on Github – https://github.com/schuknight. Useful stuff from RailGirlsWgtn Github page.

Next few steps with my site will be planning out what I want and also in November I am doing a 2 day HTML course at Yoobee, so hoping to learn some cool stuff there. It will be good to learn properly after a few years of picking things up here and there!

I have also rediscovered Sublime Text text editor. I like it as it just seems nicer then Notepad++ and can put on Windows and Mac!

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How did you learn about HTML/CSS, webdesign? Got any goto sites that you think are essential? Either that you use now or learnt heaps from? What site do you recommend for me to keep developing my HTML/CSS? What site is good to start learning about Javascript?

Google Educator Groups NZ – what is it all about? #hangout

So have spent an hour plus this evening watching the first GEGNZ  – Google Educator Groups NZ.

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Wow! What a wealth of knowledge we have here in New Zealand! Great tips and tricks for Google +, Google Drive (drawing), Google Search and more.

So a list of the things I thought were really cool from this hangout…

  • adding favourites extension to Google+
  • in a Google Drawing making an image into an image map
  • ctrl+shift+v – paste without the formatting – lifesaver this one!
  • different ways to search in Google Search including voice search
  • hearing about all of the cool Google things and great professional discussion!!

…plus heaps more, go look at the hangout and the Events page of the Google site for information about tips and tricks.

Get onto Google+ if you have already and join the GEG NZ Group

Here is the recording of the hangout:

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and link to the GEG NZ Google+ group.

View the story “#GEGNZ” on Storify

Quick #HackYrClass post

So have been watching all the tweets and blog posts following Claire Amos’s initial post about hacking your classroom.
Didn’t think I was really going to have enough time to get involved with it (madly busy learning python!) but sat down with two colleagues who are doing some hacking as well and came up with how I could do it.
I teach PE and Health and we have 1 lesson of health a week. We still use a workbook set up and I often get pretty bored taking those lessons (not sure you could really cool it teaching, maybe preaching!). So I have decided to hack my Year 10 Health class. Upcoming unit is drug education and I am throwing the book out the window.

It is great that others are blogging about what they are doing. Someone I just followed that teachers science had some good ideas which I am going to hack!
It has also been great having a couple of people at school who are keen to do this as well, as good to bounce ideas of each other

Traffic light self assessment system – geddit?!

I’ve just found this site – http://letsgeddit.com/ – that seems a good tech replacement for the old traffic light paper system. A few year ago when I was teaching Year 11 Physical Education and anatomy and biomechanics, another teacher introduced me to using the traffic light system. You would have a sheet with terms or questions on one side and a column on the other and students needed to colour the empty column in with the colour that reflected how well they understood the term or question – e.g. red if the didn’t at all, green if they were sweet with it.

I am no longer teaching anatomy or Y11 PE but I straight away thought I could use this in Digital Technology, firstly with my juniors learning Scratch – to get a quick gauge of those that have used it before or not. And as we progress through the teaching and learning, checking in with where they are at with understanding Scratch as well as where they are at with their project. Oh I think this could work quite well. And with seniors learning HTML and programming etc.

Here is the page on how to get started – http://letsgeddit.com/public/articles/how-do-I-run-my-first-lesson.

I will have to have a bit more of a think about how to use in Physical Education and Health.

Have you come across geddit? How do you use it?

Keen to hear what other people are using – do you use something similar? If so, what and how?

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PE Geek workshop @ WGC

iPads in PE

Wednesday 16 April, PE Geek Workshop @ Wellington Girls’ College

I have been following Jarrod Robinson (The PE Geek – @mrrobbo) for quite a long time now and have used a lot of his apps and I have always been envious when he has posted information about workshops that he will be delivering somewhere around the world.

And then last year I think I replied to one of his tweets and asked when he would be coming to Aotearoa / New Zealand. What grew from that tweet cumulated in him being at Wellington Girls’ College today and running his iPads in PE workshop!

It was a fantastic workshop. I think I am pretty confident using my iPad and I still got heaps out of workshop. It was great being able to have the time to explore and play and have a expert leading that. It was especially worthwhile with it being focused on PE as there was consistent examples of how to apply uses of apps in practical and theory lessons.

It was hands on – which probably goes without saying with it being a workshop on iPads – but it was hands on it that the activities had been designed in such a way that they were directly relevant to what we as teachers do every day.

There were about 30 people that attended the workshop and some as far away as Napier and Taranaki – how cool is that!

I am excited to use more and more of these apps in class to augment my teaching and the learning of my students. We live in a world of technology – our students even more so –  and we can utilise the power of technology to enhance our teaching. And make it even more fun!

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Below is a list  of apps (and some notes) we had a look at in the workshop. Some that stood out for me were Three Ring, Bingo Baker (website not app), Book Creator, Video Tagger and the games – Bit Breaker, Pop Flux (will be finding more of those!).

Here is a link to the PDF of the book I created during the workshop using Book Creator. And here is the link to the epub version – open it in iBooks.

What apps do you use in your teaching and how do you use them?


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Questions: kms from venue, what  people are teaching at the moment, what devices do your students have access to, what do you have access to, what are the limitations to using technology in classes True / False box: reliable wifi in gym / where teach, do you have a permanent data projector in your practical teaching space. Students voting on what they think is the best answer, take screenshot to record into book.

Bit Breaker

Activity game app – could use in the Year 9 Fitness unit

Book Creator

Creating a book to document what we do today. Use in PE, take photos of what students are doing, skills. Selfie photo to add to cover of book. Use of video in book for workshop introduction. PE Geek post on using this app – Multimedia Rich Portfolios & PE

Bam Video Delay

How to use – high jump, 20 sec delay, front on, side on / any skill performance / task card  at base of tripod, providing feedback for what they do. Could use to record soccer game – 2 min delay, while team is sitting out, can watch video delay. Can do frame by frame and slow it down within the delay. Doesn’t save the videos. (add in screen shot of x4 to book when get app) Where can we get a tripod?

Coach’s Eye

Softball video. Some things have to pay for. Easier to get video out of. Example in session – arms different actions. Compare 2 videos, get to same point and link with button. Link a golf swing, point of contact, volleyball serves. Pete from St Oran’s uses for AS 3.2 with a tennis serve – elite for student. Recording of what seeing on screen. Can record, will record sound, and playing the video plus drawing over the top.

Tube Downloader

Download a video you want to put into Coach’s Eye. Can also use to download videos if you are going somewhere where wifi might be poor.

SloPro

Goes as slow as 1000 fps, 500 fps best. For certain things can get good information. Can do a lot of things to isolate a skill, show, talk through it.

Video Tagger

4 screens, medium, 2 sec lead in and out time. Lead in and lead out – 2 secs before the tap and 2 secs after the tap. Could get non-participants to use to record class. Can have up to 6 tags on screen. Use of 2 or 4 better. Show compilation of tagged video to students to show good and not so good skills / behaviour. Can also import video in that you have already taken. Use of students names.

i-nigma

QR scanner – very quick. Link to a reflection questions – random questions. Lots of PE applications – video, websites, photos, task cards.

Result Tracker

Add people, activities, add new result. Example activity – stork test – data information. Reaction Test. And Pop Flux.

Pop Flux

Pop the bubbles and dodge the bombs! Cool!

ACTIVE APPS

Zumba Dance $$ – Could use as a warm up. Have part of the Year 9 Fitness unit.
Fuego’s Adventure $$
Virtual Active – free app

CoachNote

Players, balls, invasion games, setting up of gym with cones etc, layout. Could use for relief. Give direction for a game, go over rules, boundaries etc.

If LED for HD

Simple app, Jarrod uses a lot. Could use at start of the lesson

Live Heart Rate Tracking

thepegeek.com/polar, can connect to smart phones / devices. Works with Polar Team app. 1 is $60, can buy

Polar Team – Free app, lets you track up to 40 people at a time.

Easy Assessment

Rubrics, videos, photos. Example – paper plane rubric. Can take videos and then do grading with rubric later on when watching the video.

AverageAsianDude –  www.thepegeek.com/dancevids

Dance Vids – Kung Fu fighting, Eye of the Tiger – could use in Dance or Fitness units.

Fitness Blender – www.fitnessblender.com

Use in Year 9 Fitness unit.

Three Ring

Free, great for assessment, very powerful. Is all cloud based. Like this, especially with being able to upload photos and videos to the cloud.

Could use for 12SPRT, Social Responsibility, video / photo / and notes records for over the whole year. Great evidence. Can give access for students to view theirs, as well as giving access to parents.

PE Apps Bingo – Bingo Baker

QR code to site – bingobaker.com

Endomondo – GPS tracking device -www.thepegeek.com/endomondo

SprintTimer – thepegeek.com/photofinish – have to be at a height

Webscorer Race Timer – thepegeek.com/webscorer

Cardiograph – thepegeek.com/cardio

Jump It – thepegeek.com/jumpit

Virtual Heart thepegeek.com/virtualheart

SnappyCam thepegeek.com/snappy

Bleep Test Prothepegeek.com/bleep

 

 

 

 

LoopEd 2014 Conference

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LoopEd 2014 Conference website

Jane Gilbert: Keynote

‘FUTURE-ORIENTED’ EDUCATION…WHAT IS IT? WHY SHOULD WE CARE?

This presentation will look at some of the ‘big ideas’ in circulation about why we need major change in our education system.

It will argue that, because these ideas are not well-understood, we are largely continuing with ‘business as usual’, and that, as a result, we will not be able to meet the needs of 21st century students and/or the society they will live in. The presentation will then look at how we could begin to do some of the ‘circuit-breaker’ thinking needed to move education into the 21st century.

(link to presentation)

Twitter hashtag – #looped14 – View the story “#looped2014” on Storify

Challenge-  not to get hooked into how exciting these things are; look at what aspect is more of the same and what is actually new stuff, doing stuff that is different.

Education is not about getting more and more students further along the production line.

Purpose is to build the kind of society we want,  to give people the capacity to participate in that society. Lots of tweets of this statement!

Live blogging #Looped2014 – @BENJAMINJRILEY